Early tomorrow morning I leave on my road trip down western America. This is our schedule:

Hiking around at Mt. St. Helens—in the devastation zone

The Columbia river gorge

Lava tubes at Craters of the Moon

Geysers and thermal pools in the backcountry at Yellowstone

The Grand Tetons

Cave tour and a rock glacier at Great Basin National Park

Hoodos at Bryce Canyon

Crazy sediments at Zion National Park

And ending with one big, huge view at the North rim of the Grand Canyon

Goodbye for two weeks.


aastronaut:

A photoshoot: My Cat



scinote:

Question: Does “nothing” exist in Void spaces, or is there something there?

Asked by not-so-creative-bagel

Answer: Well, it depends on what you mean when you say “nothing” (especially when you use air quotes…).

Below is an interview with Lawrence Krauss, who has written a world-renowned book on the subject called “A Universe From Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather Than Nothing):

When you think about nothing you have to be a little more careful than you normally are; because, in fact, nothing is a physical concept because it’s the absence of something, and something is a physical concept. And what we’ve learned over the last hundred years is that nothing is much more complicated than we would’ve imagined otherwise.

For example, the simplest kind of nothing is the kind of nothing of the Bible. Say an infinite empty space, an infinite dark void of the Bible. You know, nothing in it, no particles, no radiation, nothing. Well, that kind of nothing turns out to be full of stuff in a way or at least much more complicated than you might have imagined because due to the laws of quantum mechanics and relativity, we now know that empty space is a boiling bubbling brew of virtual particles that are popping in and out of existence at every moment.

And in fact, for that kind of nothing, if you wait long enough, you’re guaranteed by the laws of quantum mechanics to produce something. So the difference between empty space with stuff in it and empty space with nothing in it is not that great anymore. In fact, they’re different versions of the same thing. So the transition from nothing to something is not so surprising. Now you might say well that’s not good enough because you have space. Where did the space come from? Well, a more demanding definition of nothing is no space, but, in fact, once you apply the laws of quantum mechanics to gravity itself, then space itself becomes a quantum mechanical variable and fluctuates in and out of existence and you can literally, by the laws of quantum mechanics, create universes.

Create spaces and times, where there was no space and time before. So now you got no particles, no radiation, no space, no time, that sounds like nothing. But then you might say, well, you know what, you got the laws of physics. You got the laws of nature. The laws themselves are somehow something; although, I would argue in fact that that is not at all obvious or clear or necessary. But even there, it turns out physics potentially has an answer because we now have good reason to believe that even the laws of physics themselves are kind of arbitrary.

There may be an infinite number of universes, and in each universe that’s been created, the laws of physics are different. It’s completely random. And the laws themselves come into existence when the universe comes into existence. So there’s no pre-existing fundamental law. Anything that can happen, does happen. And therefore, you got no laws, no space, no time, no particles, no radiation. That’s a pretty good definition of nothing.

image

There’s a bounty of resources on this topic from Krauss we invite you to explore:

this NY Times article

his original Universe From Nothing" lecture via the Richard Dawkins Foundation

Harvard University’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study lecture by Lawrence Krauss called “A Universe From Nothing

his interview about this topic via The Agenda with Steve Paikin.

Answered by Rich E.

Edited by Yi Z.

(via sagansense)


isfuckingfun:

Cement eclipses; tiny cement skeletons haunt the streets in Mexico.

(via may-fucking-nard)



theoceanrolls:

Bamboo Skylight (by milewski)

theoceanrolls:

Bamboo Skylight (by milewski)

(via 22trees)


kreeesty:

shouldnt:

When I yawn

Accuracy at it’s finest 

(via coldwhisper)


tulipnight:

Midnight in Greenland by Sebastian Copeland




knight-who-recently-said-ni:

jellybaby74:

Bender of lines

THIS MAKES ME SO MAD!

knight-who-recently-said-ni:

jellybaby74:

Bender of lines

THIS MAKES ME SO MAD!

(Source: srsfunny, via the-science-of-time)


cenwatchglass:

Bismuth crystal illustrating the many iridescent refraction hues of its oxide surface (Alchemist-hp + Richard Bartz / Wikimedia Commons).
Bismuth is the heaviest nonradioactive element and is essentially a nontoxic neighbor of lead and thallium in the periodic table. It is mined as bismuth oxide (Bi2O3, also known as bismite) or bismuth sulfide (Bi2S3, bismuthinite), and the brittle, silvery elemental form is one of a few substances (water is another) for which the solid is less dense than the liquid. Although bismuth has been extensively used in alloys, pharmaceuticals, electronics, cosmetics, pigments, and organic, the chemistry of bismuth is perhaps the least well established of the group-15 elements (known as the pnictogens). Compounds of bismuth typically have low solubility in most solvents, so that definitive formula assignments are usually based on X-ray diffraction studies of crystalline samples that have been isolated in small or indefinite quantities. Most isolated compounds are unique rather than members of a series of related compounds illustrating fundamental chemical trends.  The bioutility of bismuth compounds has a 250-year history that includes numerous medicinal applications; however, the mechanisms of bioactivity are not understood. Moreover, as for most compounds of bismuth, the chemical characterization of biorelevant complexes remains incomplete. Although the “heavy metal” designation has impeded application of bismuth chemistry in medicine, two compounds have been extensively used for gastrointestinal medication for decades. Pepto-Bismol contains bismuth subsalicylate, and De-Nol contains colloidal bismuth subcitrate. The use of these compounds for the treatment of travelers’ diarrhea, non-ulcer dyspepsia, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug damage, and various other digestive disorders extends from the previous use of bismuth compounds in the treatment of syphilis and tumors, in radioisotope therapies, and in the reduction of the renal toxicity of cisplatin.
-Neil Burford
It’s Elemental: Bismuth
Chemical & Engineering News, September 8, 2003

cenwatchglass:

Bismuth crystal illustrating the many iridescent refraction hues of its oxide surface (Alchemist-hp + Richard Bartz / Wikimedia Commons).

Bismuth is the heaviest nonradioactive element and is essentially a nontoxic neighbor of lead and thallium in the periodic table. It is mined as bismuth oxide (Bi2O3, also known as bismite) or bismuth sulfide (Bi2S3, bismuthinite), and the brittle, silvery elemental form is one of a few substances (water is another) for which the solid is less dense than the liquid. Although bismuth has been extensively used in alloys, pharmaceuticals, electronics, cosmetics, pigments, and organic, the chemistry of bismuth is perhaps the least well established of the group-15 elements (known as the pnictogens). Compounds of bismuth typically have low solubility in most solvents, so that definitive formula assignments are usually based on X-ray diffraction studies of crystalline samples that have been isolated in small or indefinite quantities. Most isolated compounds are unique rather than members of a series of related compounds illustrating fundamental chemical trends. 

The bioutility of bismuth compounds has a 250-year history that includes numerous medicinal applications; however, the mechanisms of bioactivity are not understood. Moreover, as for most compounds of bismuth, the chemical characterization of biorelevant complexes remains incomplete. Although the “heavy metal” designation has impeded application of bismuth chemistry in medicine, two compounds have been extensively used for gastrointestinal medication for decades. Pepto-Bismol contains bismuth subsalicylate, and De-Nol contains colloidal bismuth subcitrate. The use of these compounds for the treatment of travelers’ diarrhea, non-ulcer dyspepsia, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug damage, and various other digestive disorders extends from the previous use of bismuth compounds in the treatment of syphilis and tumors, in radioisotope therapies, and in the reduction of the renal toxicity of cisplatin.

-Neil Burford

It’s Elemental: Bismuth

Chemical & Engineering News, September 8, 2003

(via the-science-of-time)


This always blows my mind

This always blows my mind

(Source: trigonometry-is-my-bitch, via the-science-of-time)



1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Powered by Tumblr. Theme by hayleyrocktrix